Helping Developmentally Delayed Adolescents and Adults Improve the Executive Capacities Necessary for Functioning as a Self-reliant Adult

$15.00 /6 month

Presenters

George McCloskey

George McCloskey, PhD

Presenter: George McCloskey, PhD

A common assumption about humans is that physical and mental development progress at the same pace such that chronological age can be used as the marker for both physical and mental maturity. Unfortunately, this often is not the case and societal expectations for the transition from adolescence to adulthood often are in conflict with the realities when maturational delays in frontal lobe development are present. Delayed development of executive capacities can negatively impact the social relationships, personal safety, and daily functioning of developmentally delayed adults, and well-intentioned but inappropriate behaviors can sometimes result in legal complications. This brief presentation will highlight those facets of executive capacity development that are the hallmarks of transitioning from adolescence to adulthood and the maturational delays that often are experienced by individuals with developmental disabilities. Ways to help developmentally challenged adolescents and young adults develop the executive capacities needed to live independently will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on bridging strategies that can help to reduce dependence on external sources of control and increase an individual’s capacity for self-reliance.

Interdisciplinary Panel Discussion with Josh Feder, MD; George McCloskey, PhD; Karen McDowell; Monica G. Osgood; Rita Solórzano, MA, CCC-SLP; Ellen Zimiles

For this discussion we will bring together an interdisciplinary panel of experts in the field of autism, young adults with developmental disabilities, medicine, executive functioning, special needs law, education, technology and media to discuss and answer questions on the morning’s themes.

Description

Presenter: George McCloskey, PhD

A common assumption about humans is that physical and mental development progress at the same pace such that chronological age can be used as the marker for both physical and mental maturity. Unfortunately, this often is not the case and societal expectations for the transition from adolescence to adulthood often are in conflict with the realities when maturational delays in frontal lobe development are present. Delayed development of executive capacities can negatively impact the social relationships, personal safety, and daily functioning of developmentally delayed adults, and well-intentioned but inappropriate behaviors can sometimes result in legal complications. This brief presentation will highlight those facets of executive capacity development that are the hallmarks of transitioning from adolescence to adulthood and the maturational delays that often are experienced by individuals with developmental disabilities. Ways to help developmentally challenged adolescents and young adults develop the executive capacities needed to live independently will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on bridging strategies that can help to reduce dependence on external sources of control and increase an individual’s capacity for self-reliance.

Interdisciplinary Panel Discussion with Josh Feder, MD; George McCloskey, PhD; Karen McDowell; Monica G. Osgood; Rita Solórzano, MA, CCC-SLP; Ellen Zimiles

For this discussion we will bring together an interdisciplinary panel of experts in the field of autism, young adults with developmental disabilities, medicine, executive functioning, special needs law, education, technology and media to discuss and answer questions on the morning’s themes.

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Although all providers in this directory have completed one or more of Profectum’s certificate training courses on the DIR-FCD model, the providers listed in this directory are independent contractors. Providers are not agents nor are they employees and nor are they under the control of Profectum Foundation. Providers are solely responsible for the quality of the services you receive.