Aggressive behavior is challenging and distressing for parents, teachers, clinicians and the children or teens themselves. Feeling unsafe and unable to regulate strong emotions frequently cause or contribute to aggressive behavior in all children, and not only in those with ASD or other developmental and mental health challenges.

Examine the underlying meanings and hidden triggers of aggression from multiple perspectives and learn both immediate strategies and long-term interventions to help children and teens develop capacities for self- monitoring and regulation, communicating feelings and fears, binding aggression in meaningful activity, and containing and processing their own and others’ emotions and anxiety.

  • Identify the role that individual differences, developmental capacities, relationships, family dynamics, school challenges, and trauma have on triggering aggressive behavior.
  • Learn effective in-the-moment strategies and long-term interventions from case presentations of young children and teens.
  • Observe how play affords a means to safely symbolize aggression, “cool” and regulate intense emotions, and promote reality testing.
  • Consider our part as therapists, teachers and parents in the cycle of dysregulation and how reflective practice can serve to transform reaction to strategy.

Reframing Aggression: Safety, Regulation, and Relationships

Arietta Slade, PhD; Professor of Clinical Child Psychology at the Yale Child Study Center, and Professor Emerita, Clinical Psychology, The City University of New York

Professionals working with children often struggle with how to respond to and understand aggressive behavior.   It is distressing for everyone in the child’s life: parents, teachers, clinicians, and health care providers.  Often, those concerned find themselves focused on the child’s behavior and how to control it.  When the child’s development has been atypical, this is even more the case.  In this presentation, we will argue that making sense of the child’s aggression requires us to think in a complex way about 1) individual differences in the capacity to self-regulate and process their own and others’ emotion, 2) the quality of the child’s primary relationships, and 3) the impact of trauma and loss on their sense of the world.  It also requires us to think in a complex way about “why”.  Processing difficulties can make it hard to achieve even a basic sense of safety in the world.  Regulation can be tenuous at best and hard won.  Caregivers and carers are essential for regulation and safety of all kinds.  Trauma and loss register like earthquakes.  Children are left few recourses but fight, flight, and freezing, all of which can be overwhelming to parents and professionals.  How can we promote safety, regulation, and meaningful relationships? How can we help parents be less overwhelmed by and more understanding of their children’s aggressive or fearful behavior? And how can we help DIR and other therapists and teachers make sense of and address these aspects of the child’s emotional life, for themselves, as well as the parents?

Aggression: The Failure of Symbolization

Understanding the emotional hierarchy of early symbolic development and reality testing  promotes the safe expression of aggressive threats and impulses

Serena Wieder, PhD; Clinical Director, Profectum Foundation

Symbolic pretense, the practice of inventing imaginary situations and solutions in play, tell a story revealing the child’s inner world and developmental readiness to engage in her or his emotional life. As children discover the wide range of emotions and behavior in themselves and others, fantasies of magic, power and victory create “happily ever after” reassurances. But when experience is fraught with failure, anger, anxiety, fear, or trauma, made even more intense by sudden sensations and movement, they may be thrown into alarm, avoidance, flight or aggressive behavior. Stranded with intense emotionality, symbolic solutions escape them.  When aggression prevails it confronts us with the failure symbolization and self-regulation where the child inflicts his feelings, fears and anxiety on another, unable to use language, images, or symbolic play to communicate. When development falters, reality testing may be episodic at best, and anticipating the impact or consequences of such behavior are beyond reach.  Intervention that does not include play experiences to develop symbolic capacities within the safety of relationships able to engage in the child’s emotions, can give reign to uncertainty and the possibility of aggressive behavior.

What’s Between Aggression, Threat, and Anxiety; When is Aggression Really Aggression: Hidden Triggers and Latent Meanings

Tal Baz, MS, OTR/L and Gilbert Foley, EdD; Profectum Senior Faculty

Exploring the ways in which the behavior of aggression can be understood and responded to as a symptom expression of emotion dysregulation, perception of threat, the experience of anxiety, and a bid for help.

When asked, “Why?”, he said, “…whoever attacks me I attack it. I am just defending myself, it’s my only chance of escaping”

In this case-based presentation, we will describe the clinical reasoning and therapeutic process of a group of young boys, all with ASD, and manifesting different levels and different expressions of the behavior we usually refer to as Aggression. Through this descriptive analysis, we will aim to unearth and illuminate the underlying mechanisms which can trigger aggressive behavior, while paying special attention to contributing Individual differences and developmental capacities of each child, as well as the intricate dynamics among the children. In addition, we will articulate therapeutic strategies to be used both in the moment and as part of a general longer term therapeutic intervention aimed to modulate regulation of arousal and perception of safety, while decreasing anxiety and, with it, the tendency for aggressive behavior.

Lori Jeanne Peloquin, PhD
Lori Jeanne Peloquin, PhD
Ruby Salazar, LCSW, BCD
Ruby Salazar, LCSW, BCD
Stacy Sue Rosello, MA, OTR/L
Stacy Sue Rosello, MA, OTR/L
Lauren Blaszak
Lauren Blaszak

Panel Presentation

From “Boys to Teens”- An Already Difficult Developmental Transition Made More Challenging When Fraught with Aggression: What it Communicates; What it Means, and What to Do

Lori Jeanne Peloquin, PhD, Clinical Psychologist, Profectum Senior Faculty;Ruby Salazar, LCSW, BCD, Founder and Director of Pennsylvania Lifespan Services, Profectum Senior Faculty; Stacy Sue Rosello, MA, OTR/L, Director/Founder of Embrace the Child, Ltd, Profectum Assistant Faculty;  Lauren Blaszak, BA, Co-founder/Executive Director, Celebrate the Children School

This panel will share the stories of two boys with different developmental profiles and trajectories whose shared desire for friendships and “fitting-in” came into sharp focus as they moved into adolescence. Their frustrations and emotional conflicts were expressed through aggressive behavior, enveloping their families and schools in a web of anxiety, confusion and dysregulation.

The first story shares the lens of school and educator, illuminating the importance of school, parent and mental health collaboration to “see” through the aggression to the student’s inner suffering, distress and frustration in expressing his emotional experience, complex trauma and inability to find success in his world. School staff also needed support to manage their own feelings of threat, anxiety, and helplessness as they worried about this boy being hurt or hurting others. Creating safety by embracing a developmental perspective proved the turning point towards helping this boy better self-regulate and communicate his desires, hopes and frustrations.

The second story, in which acute anxiety and stress were expressed more in aggressive words and threats than action, will be shared through the lens of an occupational therapist. The focus of the OT intervention was on the erupting developmental upheaval occurring as this boy moved into puberty and the tendency to embody his conflicting emotions. Embracing a developmental perspective, understanding his individual differences, and supporting family interactions helped to unite the team, integrate the interventions and foster meaningful therapeutic and family cohesion.

The panel moderator and discussant, (both mental health professionals), will share reflections and compare and contrast these two complex cases, highlighting their common themes, uniqueness, coordinated cross-disciplinary interventions, and the crucial importance of understanding development to understand and therapeutically address aggression.

8:00
Registration Opens
9:00 – 9:15
Welcome
Serena Wieder, PhD, Clinical Director, Profectum Foundation
9:15 – 10:45
Reframing Aggression: Safety, Regulation, and Relationships
Arietta Slade, PhD
Clinical Professor at the Yale Child Study Center, and Professor Emerita in the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology at the City University of New York
10: 45 – 11:00
BREAK
11:00 – 12:30
What’s Between Aggression, Threat, and Anxiety; When is Aggression Really Aggression: Hidden Triggers and Latent Meanings
Tal Baz, MS, OTR and Gil Foley, EdD, Profectum Senior Faculty
12:30 – 1:15
LUNCH
1:15 – 3:15
Panel Presentation:  From “Boys to Teens”- An Already Difficult Developmental Transition Made More Challenging When Fraught with Aggression: What it Communicates; What it Means, and What to Do
Lori Jeanne Peloquin, PhD, Profectum Senior Faculty; Ruby Moye Salazar, LCSW, BCD, Profectum Senior Faculty;  Stacy Sue Rosello, MA, OTR-L, Assistant Faculty; Lauren Blaszak, BA
3:15 – 3:30
BREAK
3:30 – 4:30
Aggression: The Failure of Symbolization – Understanding the emotional hierarchy of early symbolic development and reality testing  promotes the safe expression of aggressive threats and impulses
Serena Wieder, PhD, Clinical Director, Profectum Foundation

4:30 – 5:00
Q&A – All Presenters
Not offered for CE credit

Registration Information

Registration Type Early Bird
Now thru Dec. 27th
Member*
Dec 28 – Feb 2
Non-Member
Dec 28 – Feb 2
Group of 3+
Dec 28 – Feb 2
In Person w/ Lunch $195 $205 $235 $205
In Person w/OUT Lunch $185 $195 $225 $195
In Person w/ Lunch & CE Fee $225 $235 $265 $235
In Person w/OUT Lunch & CE Fee $215 $225 $255 $225
Virtual Registration** $185 $195 $225 $195
Virtual Registration & CE Fee $225 $255 $225

IMPORTANT NOTE FOR VIRTUAL REGISTRANTS

  • Only the purchaser of the Virtual Registration may watch the LIVE ZOOM session.  Each viewer much purchase a virtual registration.
  • Due to the copyrights and the sensitive and private nature of the materials being presented, recording of the session and still photography is STRICTLY PROHIBITED.
  • By purchasing a Virtual Registration, you understand and accept the terms of the registration noted above.

*Members must have a current, paid (professional or parent) yearly membership to qualify for this rate.
Members, email emily.mohr@profectum.org for the coupon code to use at checkout to receive the member rate.

** Virtual Registrants will attend the conference live (real time) via Zoom from their location using their computer, tablet or phone. There are a limited number of virtual registrations available. Detailed instructions on how to attend the conference virtually will be closer to the date of the conference.


Parent Scholarships

Profectum has received funding to be able to offer scholarships for parents to attend the Conference.

These scholarships are limited and will be awarded on a first come first serve basis and reduce the conference registration fee w/out lunch or virtual registration to $50.

Click on the Parent Scholarship Application button below to complete an online application.

Your completed application will be reviewed by our Parent Scholarship Coordinator. You will be contacted and will receive further instructions on how to register.

Registration and Cancellation Policy

Registrations and payments must be received no later than Friday, January 17, 2020. Confirmations and receipts are furnished by email. Any registration received after Friday, January 17, 2020 will be considered, providing space is available.

We DO NOT invoice for our events. All attendees or groups must have a paid registration prior to the event.

Written cancellation or change notifications must be received no later than Friday, January 17, 2020 via email to emily.mohr@profectum.org. A cancellation/change processing fee of $25 will be charged.

After Friday, January 17, 2020, no refunds or credit for future events will be given. Substitute attendees are welcome but we must be notified with their name and contact information. Please understand that if you do not attend you are still liable for full payment.

In the unlikely event that this program is cancelled, you will be notified immediately via email and a credit will be issued toward a rescheduled conference, or the entire submitted registration fee will be refunded without further liability on the part of the organizer.

Additional Registration Information

Registration opens at 8:00 am. Please check-in at the registration desk to receive your name badge and day of schedule. Sessions will start promptly at 9:00 am.

Printed presentation handouts will NOT be provided. Presentation handouts will be available on our website approximately 1-week prior to the conference for you to download and/or print if desired.

As you prepare to attend this conference, remember that meeting room climates vary, so we recommend that you wear layered clothing to ensure your personal comfort. As a consideration to all participants, we ask that you turn all cellular phones and pagers to a non-audible mode during the presentations. Children and unregistered guests are not permitted in the meeting rooms.

More detailed information will be emailed to you closer to the date of the conference.

Accommodations for Persons with Disabilities & Special Needs Request

If you require ADA accommodations or have a special needs request, please email emily.mohr@profectum.org at least 1-week prior to the conference date so that arrangements can be made.

Continuing Education

A general certificate of attendance will be issued to all conference participants via email.  Specific approved continuing education boards certificates of attendance will be sent to participants who are registered and complete the course requirements for continuing education credits. The certificate will note the number of instructional hours for the day in attendance.

Registration opens at 8:00 am. Check-in at the CE registration desk to receive your name badge and day of schedule. Sessions will start promptly at 9:00 am.

 


Completion Requirements

For those learners that have signed up for Continuing Education credit,  you are required to complete the following course requirements:

In Person CE registrants:

  • Sign in & out at the start and end of the day
  • Submit an evaluation format the end of the day
  • Click here to Submit Learner Identification Information
  • Please visit the CE registration desk upon arrival
  • NY Social Work: Learners must attend the entire Conference day to receive credit, no partial credit can be issued.
  • AOTA: For presentations that are CEU approved, learners must attend the presentation for the full scheduled time. Credit will be awarded for those CEU approved presentations that were attended fully.

Virtual CE registrants:

  • Type and send your Full Name in the “chat” in ZOOM to check in 3 times during the day.
    1) Before the conference begins
    2) After lunch but before the presentation begins
    3) At the end of the conference before the Zoom meeting ends.
  • Complete post Conference Quiz with 80% or better score.
  • Click here to Submit Learner Identification Information
  • NY Social Work: Learners must attend the entire Conference day to receive credit, no partial credit can be issued.
  • AOTA: For presentations that are CEU approved, learners must attend the presentation for the full scheduled time. Credit will be awarded for those CEU approved presentations that were attended fully.

Occupational Therapists/Occupational Therapy Assistants
Profectum Foundation is an AOTA Approved Provider of continuing education. Provider #9365. This Conference is offered for up to .6 AOTA CEUs / 6 Contact Hours (Intermediate Education Level)

 

 

 

The assignment of AOTA CEs does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products, or clinical procedures by AOTA. See course complete requirements section above. AOTA Classification Codes that apply to this Conference:  Domain of OT – Performance Skills | Occupational Therapy Process – Evaluation | Occupational Therapy Process – Intervention

If a learner is in need of their participant record from this Course, send an email with the request to the AOTA CE Administrator at liza.kali@profectum.org

New York Licensed Master Social Workers & Licensed Clinical Social Workers
Profectum Foundation is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #SW-0413. This Conference is approved for up to 6 contact hours. Registrants must attend the entire Conference day to receive credit, no partial credit can be issued.

 


Contact your own board or organization for specific filing requirements. Download and save the Conference Brochure and keep your certificate of attendance.

Visit the Registration tab for our Cancellation Policy.

Lunch is available for purchase with your registration to the Conference.

Lunch consists of a Parve Sandwich Buffet with choice of:

  • Tuna Salad, Egg Salad, Roasted Vegetables, Hummus and Tamari Tofu Sandwiches
  • Chef’s Side Salad
  • Cookie
  • Cold Beverage (Water, Assorted Sodas)

All catering is provided by FLIK and is Kosher under the strict supervision of the Orthodox Union (OU).

Please note: The UJA Federation of NY has a strict policy that absolutely no outside food/beverage may be brought in. 

Attendees who did not purchase lunch will need to dine at a location outside of the venue during lunch.

Lunch cannot be purchased onsite, it must be purchased ahead.

Want to be a Conference Sponsor?

View the Conference Sponsorship Prospectus for the details and the amenities available to you.

Conference Location

UJA-Federation of New York
130 E. 59th Street
New York, New York 10022

Area Hotels

A discounted room block is available at:

Renaissance New York Hotel 57
130 E 57th St
New York, NY 10022

Discounted Rates Available February 1 – 3, 2020
Reservation Cut-off Date: Tuesday, December 17, 2019 or if room block sells out first.

If making a reservation after the cut-off date, email Maggie.Moriarty@ marriott.com regarding room rate before booking.

Link to make online reservations through the discounted block. Click here

Area hotels within a few blocks of the Conference Venue.

Fitzpatrick Manhattan Hotel NY
687 Lexington Ave
New York, NY 10022

Concorde Hotel New York
127 E 55th St
New York, NY 10022

Carvi Hotel New York
152 E 55th St
New York, NY 10022

Click to go to the Conference Handout page.  This is a password protected page available to conference attendees only.  An email will be sent 1 week prior to the Conference to registered attendees that contains the password.

HANDOUT PAGE

Thank You to Our Sponsors